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A Game for All Reasons (Are We Having Any Fun Yet?)

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A friend of mine told me an interesting story of how one time, he and Ben Hogan were sitting in the Grill Room at Shady Oaks CC in Fort Worth, when one of his friends walked by and said 'Hello'. When asked how he played, the guy replied…

A friend of mine told me an interesting story of how one time, he and Ben Hogan were sitting in the Grill Room at Shady Oaks CC in Fort Worth, when one of his friends walked by and said 'Hello'. When asked how he played, the guy replied, “We played absolutely awful and really stunk up the place, BUT, we sure had a lot of fun out there”. After he left the table, Mr. Hogan turned to my friend, and said, “Anybody who thinks it’s fun to spend 4+ hours hitting tops, shanks, skulls, OB's missing short putts, and destroying their egos and pride, etc., is a “Damn Liar, OR, Completely Insane”.

I tend to agree with Hogan – BUT, over a lifetime of being deep inside the golf world and intermingling with virtually thousands of people, I’ve broken down the definition of 'Fun' as it pertains to the perspectives of different types of golfers

1). The Tournament Golfer: Mr. Hogan also said that "there’s two types of golf": Tournament Golf, and Social Golf – and, that "the two aren’t even remotely related”. On this point, the late John Schlee who was a good friend of mine, once found himself walking down the 72nd fairway in the final group of the 1973 U.S Open paired with Arnold Palmer – and was THE only man on the planet who had a chance to tie Johnny Miller, who had just posted the lowest score in the history of the Open. With Arnold Palmer and the entire golf world cheering him on National TV, John had definitely experienced the thrill of a lifetime, and after he retired from competition, he rarely played any ‘social golf’. When asked why he seldom played anymore, he told me, “Roger I’ve been to the top of the golf world and had my 15 minutes of fame, and after having experienced almost winning the U.S. Open, going out to play social golf is like trying to talk Norman Rockefeller into playing casual a game of Monopoly” .

2). Then there’s Social Golf: The Social Golfer somewhat understands the game but doesn’t care about golf enough to compete in competition and match their true talents against Tournament players, and

3). The Aesthetic Golfer: The Aesthetic Golfer doesn't ‘Really’ Love the ’Actual Playing' of the game, but rather gets their fun from just being around the Aesthetics and people in the Golf Environment (and some who just like the status that being a golfer or CC member brings).

No matter what your perspective is on golf – and what your reasons are for playing the game, Golf is definitely a ‘Game for ALL Reasons!’

 

And, that's no stretch.

Roger